Shoe Superstitions: British and Irish Folklore Unlaced

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Shoes aren’t just keeping your feet warm, they carry centuries of cultural significance and folklore. Here are 10 fascinating shoe superstitions from Britain and Ireland.

Shoe Superstitions: British Folklore Uncovered

Put your best foot forward with these 10 fascinating shoe superstitions!

Never put new shoes on a table

This is considered bad luck in many English-speaking countries. One possible reason for this superstition is that tables were traditionally used for preparing food, and it was believed that putting shoes on a table could contaminate the food.

Don’t put your shoes on the wrong feet

This superstition is believed to have originated in medieval times when shoes were made specifically for the left and right foot. Wearing them on the wrong feet could cause discomfort and lead to injury.

Shoes on the bed bring bad luck

This superstition is common in Ireland (and anywhere we would imagine) and is thought to have originated from the belief that shoes are carriers of dirt and disease. Putting them on the bed could invite sickness into the house.

Don’t wear green shoes on stage

In Scotland, it is considered unlucky for actors to wear green shoes on stage. This superstition is thought to have originated from the fact that green dye was expensive and difficult to produce, so it was often used sparingly in costumes. Wearing green shoes would be seen as showing off.

Never buy shoes on a Friday

This is a common superstition in many English-speaking countries. It is believed that buying shoes on a Friday will bring bad luck, although the reason for this belief is unclear.

Don’t leave your shoes upside down

In Wales, it is believed that leaving your shoes upside down will bring bad luck. One possible explanation for this is that it resembles the shape of a coffin and is therefore seen as a symbol of death.

Never gift shoes to your partner

In some parts of England, it is considered unlucky to give shoes as a gift to your partner. This superstition may have originated from the idea that giving shoes symbolises the end of a relationship.

Don’t wear new shoes to a funeral

This superstition is common in many English-speaking countries. It is believed that wearing new shoes to a funeral will bring bad luck and possibly even death.

Always tie your shoelaces

In Scotland, it is believed that failing to tie your shoelaces properly can bring bad luck. This superstition may have originated from the idea that loose shoelaces could cause accidents.

Never whistle in a shoemaker’s shop

In England, it is considered bad luck to whistle in a shoemaker’s shop. This superstition may have originated from the fact that shoemakers used to work in silence and whistling was seen as a disruption.

Have we missed your favourite shoe superstition? Tell us about it and your thoughts in the comments section!

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