RICK HALE takes us to Appuldurcombe House a very haunted building on the Isle of Wight

Appuldurcombe House
Wroxhall, Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight has long been believed to be inhabited by the spirits of its ancient past.

With such a reputation, it’s difficult to pick just one location to label the most haunted on this island of the dead.

Nevertheless, there is one building situated deep in the woods near Wroxhall that meets the criteria.

Appuldurcombe House, an abandoned manor house that holds many secrets. And many ghosts.

History Of Appuldurcombe House

Appuldurcombe House began its history long ago in the 11th century.

It’s believed it was the home of England’s first Norman King, William the Conqueror.

Following the death of William, the house served as the abbey for the nuns of the Poor Clares, a religious order that occupied the house for 400 years.

The breathtaking Baroque house we see today was created by, Sir Robert Worsley in the 18th century.

Sir Robert was inspired by the buildings and gardens he saw while on his travels across the European continent.

He wanted to bring that architecture back to England and chose the Isle of Wight to build his dream.

Appuldurcombe House

Appuldurcombe House on the Isle of Wight has a long list of hauntings…

Ever the admirer of fine works of art, Worsley designed the rooms to let in as much light so he, and his friends, could admire the art he brought back from Europe.

Worsley’s time at Appuldurcombe House was a golden age of sorts.

Sadly, the horrors of World War II severely damaged the house when a bomb exploded near the house.

In 1969, a preservation group attempted to restore the house to its former glory. Unfortunately, the damage was to extensive and the project had to abandoned.

Today, the house is owned by The English Heritage and has gained a reputation for being haunted by the ghosts of its past.

The Hauntings Of Appuldurcombe House

The isolation of Appuldurcombe House makes it the ideal setting for a haunting.

Anyone who has ever visited this stately old manor has come away with stories that can only be described as hair-raising.

Especially at night when the cold wind whips through the house. And the spirits walk.

The Phantom Carriage

A few visitors who have stayed past the setting sun have been treated to a spectral sight.

A phantom carriage drawn by invisible horses has been witnessed swiftly racing toward the house.

As the carriage approaches the house a curious thing occurs. The carriage fades away, and the witness is left in an eerie, unnatural silence.

The Laughing Boy

People who have stood near the Freemantle gate have the unmistakable sound of a child laughing.

Although, he is only heard but not seen, visiting psychics agree he was a five year old boy in life.

No one knows who he was, but he appears to find visitors very funny.

The Wailing Baby

Upon entering the house and wandering its corridors visitors are met by an unnerving sound.

The sound of a wailing child is carried on the wind that blows through the house.

Sceptics will argue that the sound is an animal. However, those who have heard it, insist it’s the plaintive wails of a baby.

The Phantom Monks

Visitors to the house have seen a group of ghostly monks standing near the front entrance.

They watch as the monks file through the front door and vanish.

The Thing In The Cellar

If you are brave enough to venture into the inky black recesses of the cellar, you may just might find yourself confronted by an evil force.

Visitors have reported the overwhelming sense of being watched by something hiding in the shadows.

A cold wind is said to blow through the basement as black shadows manifest and seemingly gather around the courageous visitor.

Many people have been escorted out of the cellar in a near state of panic.

Whoever, or whatever, inhabits the cellar clearly doesn’t want visitors in its domain.

Why visit Appuldurcombe House?

The Isle of Wight’s, Appuldurcombe House is open for daily tours.

And the council will occasionally allow ghost hunters in to investigate the building.

Their hope, evidence will be provided to back up their assertion that this ancient manor is truly haunted by the spirits of old.

Rick Hale
Leave a reply

Leave a Reply